Hope Lies at 24 Frames Per Second

On The Seventh Art In The Age Of The Digital.

Monday Blu(e)s And DVD.

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It’s a landmark week for problematic Columbia Tristar sequels in home video.

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Inverting The Setpiece. Kelly Reichardt’s Night Moves.

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In Arthur Penn’s 1975 film Night Moves, a movie that shares a name with American filmmaker Kelly Reichardt’s latest picture, but little else, that film’s protagonist, the outta-be-iconic Harry Moseby pointedly declares that he “saw a Rohmer film once. It was kinda like watching paint dry”. Some might apply the same sentiment towards the work of Reichardt, a thoughtful, temporally daring filmmaker.  Continue reading

Brief Thoughts On The Dardenne Brothers’ Two Days, One Night.

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The Dardennes are two of the most reliable filmmakers in the world. For almost two decades now they’ve been producing epoch defining cinema, while in 2012′s  The Kid With A Bike they produced one of that year’s highlights of the year in cinema. Continue reading

Scalarama.

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I’ve been meaning to mention Scalarama for a while now, but it got lost in the deluge of busy-ness that has been August. It all kicks off next week, and runs September 1st thru 30th. Events take place across the UK, and more information can be found in a specially produced Scalarama newspaper, physical copies of which can be picked up in certain venues, or it can be read online here. I’ll be at one of the screenings of Satantango, organised by A Nos Amours.

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Monday Blu(e)s And DVD.

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Truffaut, Lang and Herzog dominate the week in home video.  Continue reading

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I Get To Be Myself And I Get To Sing. Stuart Murdoch’s God Help The Girl.

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Coming of age in the late 1990s Belle And Sebastian, the 7-piece chamber pop outfit from Glasgow were something of a near-mythical enigma. Their first record, 1996′s Tigermilk was impossibly difficult to get hold of for a 13-year-old wannabe indie popster, intrigued about the band upon reading of their adventures in the New Musical Express and Melody Maker.

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Jim Hillier. RIP.

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In cinephile circles there are a number of figures upon whom enough tribute can ever be paid. Continue reading

Welles Begins. Too Much Johnson.

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While Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane is, quite rightfully, held up as cinema’s greatest debut, the tale of Charles Foster Kane wasn’t the first time the American filmmaker stepped behind the camera.

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