It’s a fantastic week for new home video releases, with the Masters Of Cinema pulling out all the stops with Coppola and Godard amongst others, while elsewhere one of television’s finest shows makes it to disc.

Disc Of The Week

Rumble Fish - Perhaps the best known of Francis Ford Coppola’s 1980’s produced films, Rumble Fish is one of the great American films about youth. Dillon, Lane, Hopper and Cage all serve well, but it’s a young Mickey Rourke who impresses the most, the man barely recognisable from his current visage. A fantastic Blu-ray comes complete with a wide range of solid extras, including an audio commentary from Coppola himself. Blu-ray-only.

Ro. Go. Pa. G – A portmanteau film produced in the mid-1960’s, Ro.Go.Pa.G sees the combined mights of Godard, Pasolini, Rossellini and Gregoretti together in one feature. La Ricotta, the Pasolini segment featuring Orson Welles as a struggling filmmaker has been a longtime favourite of Hope Lies, although there’s a consistency across the board here. Available on DVD and Blu-ray.

Detention – Joseph Kahn graduated from the 1990’s music video and marketing circuit to direct his feature film debut Torque in 2004, the critical failure of which (coupled with a failed attempt to bring William Gibson’s Neuromancer to the screen) meant that it was seven years before the director got behind a camera again for this self-funded horror-comedy. We’ve yet to check out our copy, but look out for a full review later in the week. DVD-only.

The Walking Dead – Season Two – TV isn’t the domain of Hope Lies at 24 Frames Per Second, but we’d be lying if we claimed that this adaptation of the Robert Kirkman hadn’t caught our attention. Building from a staggered opening couple of episodes, Season Two builds towards one of the most satisfying finale’s in recent memory, and a serial that puts most modern zombie flicks to shame. Available on DVD and Blu-ray. Also available in a collection that comprises of Season’s One and Two.

The Dinosaur Project- The Dinosaur Project, a British found-footage film bears all of the hallmarks of the typical online faux-phenomenon (fauxnomenon?) in that the early word from Comic-Con was greeted fairly excitedly, only for interest to wane the more was revealed. A limited theatrical release just two weeks ago went by largely unnoticed, no doubt it will do just fine on the £5 supermarket DVD circuit. Available on DVD and Blu-ray.