Today sees the unveiling of Eureka’s Masters Of Cinema Spring 2013 schedule. Yes, there are plenty of amazing titles still to come before next year falls, but let’s not let that get in the way of looking even further forward. With the exception of Kaneto Shindo’s Onibaba each title marks the bow of a new director to the collection, with the national cinemas of Germany, Italy, America, France and Japan all represented, and goliaths of world cinema such as Fellini and Kubrick welcomed to the line-up.

Fear And Desire – Stanley Kubrick’s debut work has long been the source of much controversy. While legend seems keen to insist the Fear And Desire was a work not only abandoned but supressed by it’s maker, the reality is a little more complex. Following in the wake of the recent announcement that Kino Lorber would release the recently restored film on disc, Masters Of Cinema are following suit, with an edition that, if precedent is anything to go by, will outshine it’s American counterpart by some way.

Onibaba – The sole upgrade this season, which is a surprise considering the long promised re-issue of F.W. Murnau’s Tabu and Alain Resnais’ Muriel, Kaneto Shindo’s Onibaba is a long-term favourite of the collection, with this reappraised disc no doubt to be welcomed keenly.

La Citta Delle Donne – Fellini’s 1980 film sees the directors muse Marcello Mastroianni embark upon an odyssey in which he faces his relationship with the women around him. Playing with the core themes (surreality, dreams, nostalgia) one would associate with the Italian filmmaker, City Of Women, to give the film its English-language title, is a neat late-period work from the director.

La Poison – Sacha Guitry is a filmmaker long neglected by home video in the UK, so it’s fantastic to see La Poison given such a lavish treatment here. A comedic tale of husband and wife at war, the presence of Michel Simon ought to give one an idea of just what type of film La Poison is.

The Blue Angel – Each quarter the Masters Of Cinema appear to outdo themselves with at least one particular title. Winter 2012 was defined by the aquisition of The Passion Of Joan Of Arc, while the same period twelve months earlier saw Touch Of Evil gain the big headlines. While facing stiff competition from Kubrick et co. it’ll be difficult to see anything topping the arrival of Josef von Sternberg’s classic of the Weimar German period Der Blaue Engel on high definition disc. Sourced from a recent restoration, and inclusive of both the original German language version and the lesser seen English language iteration, this package is nothing short of superlative.

Check out the complete Masters Of Cinema collection online at MastersOfCinema.org. You could win this month’s line-up of Masters Of Cinema titles here at Hope Lies, by clicking here.